Your Career and You: “They Only Seem Like ‘Little Things’”


Publication1 (2)I was struck today with the realization…not new, but definitely reassuring…that the “little things” that you do are oftentimes not so “little.”

More than anything, it was a reminder of and reinforcement for why you do things for others when asked with no expectation…or thought…of reciprocation. You’re doing it simply because.

This particular occasion was the result of some introductions I made for some of my Curry College students/friends who have been enjoying an amazing winter break vacation in London with (he muttered jealously) side-trips to Amsterdam and to Barcelona.

I’ve had the pleasure of having all of them in one or more of my Communication classes at Curry and have been able to tempt at least a couple of them over to the “dark side” of the Public Relations Concentration. Every single one of them has the potential to be, in my totally biased opinion, a certified PR rockstar!

So…bottom line on this part…I just got “thank-you” messages via Twitter indicating that the meetings with my PR colleagues in London went very well, and new networking connections have been made for my Curry friends.

I’m blessed as a PR professional/professor to have other professional and/or academic friends around the world, all of whom are “wired” just like I am…to provide assistance/ guidance/advice when asked. Why? Because we all got where we are today because someone else was willing to provide us assistance/guidance/ advice in our earlier careers.

I’ve written about this before, so I won’t go overboard, but the “little” things that others do for you often turn out to be major, life-/career-changing actions.

  • My original mentor Clinton Parks, with the US Army Training and Doctrine Command’s Public Affairs Office, gave me my initial start as a PR pro.
  • My good friend Scott Shirai, at that time with Hawaiian Electric Industries, made a phone call that led to my being offered the best PR job of my entire professional career.
  • My academic colleague now retired/then-Department Chair at Curry College, George Wharton, encouraged me to apply for what is now a decade-long position teaching public relations and other communication courses.

There have been others in my nearly 50-year career as PR pro/PR prof, but these three truly played a major part in my professional…AND personal…life.

My greatest hope at this point in life is that each of these gentlemen realizes that what may have seemed like a “little thing” to him was, for me, a HUGE gesture.

So we do this when asked by others. We pick up the phone and make a call. We send a quick note via email to a distant colleague. We help when asked…with no expectation or thought of reciprocation. We simply do it because…

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About kirkhazlett

35+ years' federal government and nonprofit organization PR experience followed by more than 10 years' undergraduate and graduate college teaching experience. Community and media relations expertise, as well as a fanaticism for quality service and customer satisfaction. PR for healthcare and member services organizations ranging from Blood Bank of Hawaii to Medical Area Service Corporation to Boston Harborfest. Consulting services for Manila and Singapore Red Cross.
This entry was posted in careers, Communication, Curry College, job hunting, job search, mentoring, networking, PR, PR students, public relations, social media, Undergraduate Communication and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Your Career and You: “They Only Seem Like ‘Little Things’”

  1. dickpirozzolo says:

    Kirk—terrific post. Yes indeed, it is what we give without expectation of any reward that builds lifelong relationships and carers.

    Like

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